Archive for December, 2009

Semantic System Finalizes OEM Contract with CENDOO

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

Zurich, Switzerland/La Jolla, USA December 16 – CENDOO and Semantic System have entered into an OEM contract to use Semantic’s ai-one™ in CENDOO’s Butler product.

Ever felt overwhelmed by too much information and communication? CENDOO and Semantic System are working on a totally new approach to tackle one of the biggest challenges for users of information technology:  information overload (see “Drowning in Information? You’re Not Alone of Huffington Post). While search engines are getting ever more powerful and provide more and more features, this is also bad news.  Users are swamped with huge amounts of information and the user has to go through the results to find what is of interest and relevant.  This process has to be repeated and refined, sometimes with multiple search engines, until he or she has found the right answers. Search engines available aren’t providing the essential feature: personalized semantic search.

Running on your PC as a virtual twin, CENDOO’s Butler knows your focus and preferences,  ”reading” and classifying search results and documents until it can deliver exactly and precisely what you need. The Butler will be available in 2010. Learn more: www.cendoo.com

To view the entire press release please click here: PR-20091216-Cendoo-finalizes-contract.

Don’t know what to do next? Your phone does

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009
Researchers have created an “aware” cell phone that learns the user’s behaviour pattern. The phone could provide a better service, for example how to better manage the video download when the user is about to leave the 3G network range.
The phone uses the built-in accelerometer and a neural network software to predict what happens next and act accordingly. Would you like such a gadget?
(via newscientist.com)

Researchers have created an “aware” cell phone that learns the user’s behaviour pattern. The phone could provide a better service, for example how to better manage the video download when the user is about to leave the 3G network range.

The phone uses the built-in accelerometer and a neural network software to predict what happens next and act accordingly. Would you like such a gadget?

(via newscientist.com)

“Economy Contracts, the Digital Universe Expands”

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

“At nearly 500 billion gigabytes the Digital Universe, if converted to pages of text and assembled into books, would stretch to Pluto and back 10 times.  At the current growth rate, that stack of books is growing 20 times faster than the fastest rocket ever made.

The Digital Universe is also messy.  Because the image bits account for so much of the total, more than 95% of the data in the Digital Universe is unstructured meaning its intrinsic meaning cannot be easily divined by simple computer programs. ……. The Semantic Web project is promising to develop the tools to help us do that in the future.  “

“The last time we saw a confluence of two such powerful trends – an explosion of new and potentially disruptive technologies and an economic crisis of this magnitude- was before the computer was invented.  The challenge of a lifetime is also the chance of a lifetime.”

See the full report at Digital Universe – Multimedia presentation by EMC/IDC

http://www.emc.com/collateral/demos/microsites/idc-digital-universe/iview.htm

AI anchors to replace human journalists

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

Engineers at Northwestern University have created with “News At Seven” an entire newsroom operation that uses artificial intelligence to collect stories, produce graphics and even anchor broadcasts via avatars. Check out the NSF video (with a text version).

Are bigger brains always better?

Thursday, December 3rd, 2009

Research shows that animals with bigger brains are not necessarily more intelligent. Honeybees for example can count and categorise similar objects like human faces, traits that scientist previously thought were limited to larger animals. So, what are big(ger) brains for?

(via sciencedaily.com)