Archive for September, 2010

Robot interprets your dreams

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

In the movie Inception people could enter into the dreams of other people. However, science is not so far from this Science Fiction. Researchers have developed the Sleep Waking robot that plays back your dreams – that is play back your movements when you dream. The researchers collect EEG, EKG, REM data of the dreamer. A machine learning algorithm identifies the patterns which is used to animate the robot. Watch the video or read more (livescience.com).

Rodney Brooks: Our robot future

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

Rodney Brooks, cofounder of iRobot and former director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory envisions a future where a robot is as ubiquitous as computers today. Watch the video below or read the Discover article “The Robot Invasion Is Coming—and That’s a Good Thing“.

Giving robots the ability to deceive

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Imagine a robot deceiving its enemies by hiding so it won’t get caught…

A team at Georgia Tech Research Institute in the US is teaching robots how to deceive other machines and humans. Read how robots capable of deception may be valuable for several different areas, including military and search and rescue operations. (gatech.edu)

Brain-controlled, AI-augmented wheelchairs sees and avoids obstacles

Thursday, September 9th, 2010

Researchers at the EPFL in Switzerland have developed a wheelchair that it has on-board cameras which can identify and avoid obstacles without the need for any user intervention. The wheelchair is controlled the user’s EEG signals. Read the article (epfl.ch) or see for yourself.

Diversity of neurons increases information in the brain

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that the diversity in how neurons respond to incoming stimuli is essential to overall brain function and to how neurons process complex stimuli and code information. More in the article Intrinsic biophysical diversity decorrelates neuronal firing while increasing information content (Nature Neuroscience) or in Carnegie Mellon’s press release.